Fuck Yeah, Bette Davis!

completelyunproductive:


Bette Davis being better than you. In front of a sand dune that is clearly real and not constructed on a soundstage. In color!

completelyunproductive:

Bette Davis being better than you. In front of a sand dune that is clearly real and not constructed on a soundstage. In color!

completelyunproductive:

IN COLOR: “Now, Voyager” (1942) — Starring Bette Davis.

(Color by me.)

I know this doesn’t look all that great or wonderful, and the gif is only 8 frames long, but I thought I’d try colorizing a bit of film to see how hard it was. It’s rather difficult. Because not only do you have to do each frame by hand, you have to make sure that the color palate is exactly the same from frame to frame.

I might do a series of these, if anyone likes them. So, if you have any requests for classic films that you’d like to see a little bit of in color, let me know!

theflapperfactor:

What. A. Dump. 
A Bette Davis Youtube Filmography:
-1930’s:
The Bad Sister (1931)
The Man Who Played God (1932)
Hell’s House (1932)
Of Human Bondage (1934)
Marked Woman (1937)
The Petrified Forest (1936)
The Golden Arrow (1936)
The Sisters (1938)
The Old Maid (1939)
-1940’s:
All This and Heaven Too (1940)
The Little Foxes (1941)
All About Eve (1949) *
-1950’s:
The Star (1952)
Phone Call From A Stranger (1952)
Stranded (1957)
With Malice Towards One (1957)
Fraction of a Second (1958)
-1960’s:
Hush Hush… Sweet Charlotte (1964)
The Nanny (1965)
-1970’s:
Death on the Nile (1978)
Strangers (1979)
-1980’s:
White Mama (1980)
Right of Way (1983)
* Part one removed

Many thanks to theflapperfactor for putting this together! Check it out, guys! Some hard-to-find films are on here.

theflapperfactor:

What. A. Dump.

A Bette Davis Youtube Filmography:

-1930’s:

-1940’s:

-1950’s:

-1960’s:

-1970’s:

-1980’s:

* Part one removed

Many thanks to theflapperfactor for putting this together! Check it out, guys! Some hard-to-find films are on here.

(via theflapperfactor-deactivated201)

theflapperfactor:

Bette Davis; to fabulous for words.
Ever wonder why Bette Davis gets so much crap? it’s because she said what every actress in Hollywood thought, but would never dream of uttering. She was a lot like Clara Bow in the fact that she realized she was not going to make it on looks (in her opinion) so trying to act like every other girl in Hollywood simply wouldn’t cut it. She was a mud slinging rebel, unafraid to get her hands (or her mouth for that matter) dirty. And again, like Clara Bow, she became both as popular as the mini skirt and as feared as the plague. This combination of reproach and admiration is what makes an it girl. The paradox is that while you are the hot new thing, you are also, as Clara put it, ”A big fat freak, Cause’ I’m myself.”
Bette even went on a speaking tour later in life, doing and saying things that would make Joan piss in her pants with delight. Bette called almost every actress imaginable a bitch and told hilarious stories of her life in Hollywood. What was shocking to everyone, was that this boosted her popularity to an almost unheard of level. It can be argued that without this speaking tour, she might not be nearly as well remembered as she is today.
What I find so endearing about Bette is that she is absolutely ruthless, unquestionably powerful, and simply, undoubtedly Bette.

theflapperfactor:

Bette Davis; to fabulous for words.

Ever wonder why Bette Davis gets so much crap? it’s because she said what every actress in Hollywood thought, but would never dream of uttering. She was a lot like Clara Bow in the fact that she realized she was not going to make it on looks (in her opinion) so trying to act like every other girl in Hollywood simply wouldn’t cut it. She was a mud slinging rebel, unafraid to get her hands (or her mouth for that matter) dirty. And again, like Clara Bow, she became both as popular as the mini skirt and as feared as the plague. This combination of reproach and admiration is what makes an it girl. The paradox is that while you are the hot new thing, you are also, as Clara put it, ”A big fat freak, Cause’ I’m myself.”

Bette even went on a speaking tour later in life, doing and saying things that would make Joan piss in her pants with delight. Bette called almost every actress imaginable a bitch and told hilarious stories of her life in Hollywood. What was shocking to everyone, was that this boosted her popularity to an almost unheard of level. It can be argued that without this speaking tour, she might not be nearly as well remembered as she is today.

What I find so endearing about Bette is that she is absolutely ruthless, unquestionably powerful, and simply, undoubtedly Bette.

(via theflapperfactor-deactivated201)

completelyunproductive:

A quick colorization I did.
(Sorry the ferns in the background look absolutely awful.)

completelyunproductive:

A quick colorization I did.

(Sorry the ferns in the background look absolutely awful.)

completelyunproductive:

Colorized by me.

completelyunproductive:

Colorized by me.

theflapperfactor:

Feminists of Film, Round One:
Bette Davis
Any conversation on feminism in film would be pointless without the mention of Bette Davis. To this day she is the symbol of the strong female on the silver screen; completely in control of her life and not about to cede that power to anybody. The basic Bette character sketch is made up of a strong woman (who may be attached to a man, but doesn’t have to be) , something dreadful that happens to her, and how she comes out the other end victorious.
The thing that has always singled Bette out is the fact that she wasn’t innocent, doe-eyed, or even trying to be good. This last point was what separated her from Joan Crawford’s strong female (whom I will touch on in round two). Bette never wanted to make the grade, she wanted to acheive her goal. In not following trends, she learned set them.
When it comes to her impact on women in America, Bette didn’t gain real influence until she had her falling out with Paramount. Like Garbo before her, taking on a studio gave Bette the biggest break she could get. It gave the average American a chance to see and understand her personality for the first time, and when they saw a liberated woman trying to be a legitimate actress through means other than the casting couch, they stood up and begged for more. From that time on, Female rolls in film changed dramatically, and, like it or not, Bette was the new black

theflapperfactor:

Feminists of Film, Round One:

Bette Davis

Any conversation on feminism in film would be pointless without the mention of Bette Davis. To this day she is the symbol of the strong female on the silver screen; completely in control of her life and not about to cede that power to anybody. The basic Bette character sketch is made up of a strong woman (who may be attached to a man, but doesn’t have to be) , something dreadful that happens to her, and how she comes out the other end victorious.

The thing that has always singled Bette out is the fact that she wasn’t innocent, doe-eyed, or even trying to be good. This last point was what separated her from Joan Crawford’s strong female (whom I will touch on in round two). Bette never wanted to make the grade, she wanted to acheive her goal. In not following trends, she learned set them.

When it comes to her impact on women in America, Bette didn’t gain real influence until she had her falling out with Paramount. Like Garbo before her, taking on a studio gave Bette the biggest break she could get. It gave the average American a chance to see and understand her personality for the first time, and when they saw a liberated woman trying to be a legitimate actress through means other than the casting couch, they stood up and begged for more. From that time on, Female rolls in film changed dramatically, and, like it or not, Bette was the new black

(via theflapperfactor-deactivated201)

My colorization.
Bette Davis in “The Old Maid.”
Bette Davis. (My colorization.)